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Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
's effective? >> as a reporter and as a former national security official and intelligence officer, i know f.b.i. agents who say it is the opposite of effective. it elicits bad information and skilled interrogators can get more faster through other techniques without having to touch anybody. i also had the opportunity to work with some of the very c.i.a. officers who are depicted in the interrogation scenes in the movie who say we didn't know what was going to happen. we needed to get information right away. and you can't say it doesn't work because we got information after using these enhanced techniques as they call them clinically that we weren't getting before. now we have nothing to compare it to. we didn't kind of do the control tests where we tortured them for one set of information and interrogated them for another and able to cancel that out scientifically. there's no proof it works any better than anything else and the moral question is so messy that frankly charlie at the end of all that with all the national peak i think the american people have kind of speaken on it. they don't have
suns tovo themselveses in jihad, according to the lawyer. the f.b.i. gained access to him in late december. allowed to question him, in what some described as kangaroo court filled with protesters for three hours. law enforcement officials say he was, "probably not a big player in the attack." l others describe it as a setback to investigation that isn't progressing. >> the department of justice is quiet about this. i hope they treat it as a terrorist activity, not just police action. the lack of apparent progress is frustrating. it doesn't seem to be a priority. >> republican congressman asked the administration to cut off aid to tunisia. keep in mind since 2011, the american government has given $320 million in taxpayer dollars to the tunisia government. i find it morally wrong for a country that obstructed f.b.i. efforts to bring them to justice. >> this president is committed to ensuring that those who were responsible of the death of four americans in libya be brought to justice. >> neither the pentagon nor state department spokesman would comment on harvey's release. >> i do
are following, could the fbi be making a big move. we'll have more on the fight by lawmaker to bring more jobs to the commonwealth. >> first, discussing the future of the u.s.'s involvement in afghanistan just days after it was announced that all troops could be out by 2014. this morning, president obama meets with afghanistan's president. we'll be back. >>> thank you is the last day of meetings for vice president joe briden's gun task force. he says he will have a list of proposals ready for the president by tuesday. the nra was in a meeting with vice president biden on yesterday. but after that particular meeting of course the gun lobby said, quote, we were disappointed with how little this meeting had to do with keeping our children safe and how much it had to do with an agenda to attack the second amendment. >>> the judge overseeing a preliminary hearing in the colorado movie theater shooting says the case can go to trial. judge william sylvester says there is enough evidence against james holmes for last summer's massacre in aurora. he faces up to 160 counts for allegedly killing 12 peopl
security official and intelligence officer, i know f.b.i. agents who say it is the opposite of effective. it elicits bad information, and skilled interrogators can get more faster through other techniques without having to touch anybody. i also had the opportunity to work with some of the very c.i.a. officers who are depicted in the interrogation scenes in the movie who say we didn't know what was going to happen. we needed to get information right away. and you can't say it doesn't work because we got information after using these enhanced techniques as they call them clinically that we weren't getting before. now we have nothing to compare it to. we didn't kind of do the control tests where we tortured them for one set of information and interrogated them for another and able to cancel that out scientifically. there's no proof it works any better than anything else and the moral question is so messy that frankly, charlie at the end of all that with all the national peak i think the american people have kind of speaken on it. they don't have a taste for it. >> rose: what was it peter,
strike an early blow in the fight over the relocation of the fbi headquarters. we'll be right back. ha never encnteredch a bning . until had thshingles. r re of the side sry, visit shinesinfoom like sebody d set a ba of hot chaoal ony neck. hai's somethg youdch a bning . ner wanto encounteochickenpx >>> 5:09 out on the weather terrace. 39 degrees here in northwest but you know with light winds it's really very comfortable. i have the heavy coat on but the novembers are off. it's not a bad cold. that comfortable cold as you call it. we will see the clouds thicken up and this afternoon expecting rain showers around. by lunchtime 48. we'll get to 50 but stay in the upper 40s with the rain showers around for the afternoon and evening hours. let's go inside with monika samtani get more on the morning commute. >>> howard a burst water main on route 501 at queens chapel road in prince george's county. watch out for the detours just being set up there at the beltway in georgia avenue here. things look good in silver spring. i will be back with more traffic and details at 5:48. back to you guys
. with respect to who carried it out, that's an ongoing investigation. the fbi had sent individuals to libya repeatedly. we have some very good leads, but this is not something that, you know, i'm going to be at liberty to talk about right now. >> megyn: well, that was president obama roughly ten days ago discussing the terror attack in libya that killed four americans, almost four months ago now, including our ambassador. yesterday we learned the one and only suspect in custody so far has just been released by tunisian authorities citing a lack of evidence against him. so, where exactly are we in our fight for justice against the terrorists who killed our ambassador and three others? virginia congressman frank wolf is a republican and a member of the house appropriations committee. you're upset among other things, that this country, tunisia that released our one and only suspect got 300 plus million in aid, why are we funneling aid to them. >> we should not be and they're about to become a millennium and means advantages. we should be cutting off the aid. the fbi team was there for five wee
former colleagues at the f.b.i. in fact derived one of most important pieces of information after 9/11 ought to be the most in the course of conventional interrogation, he elicited the name of mohamed fromn al-qaedaetaine ich was ally the key to finding out how the 9/11 operation was actually controlled. >> rose: how did he do that. that's only such an interesting point. >> yes. the guy that he was talking to, he used his childhood nickname. the agent i'm talking about is -- he chose the detainee i know a lot but. i know your childhood nickname. he treated him with respect although he didn't respect them personally butthat's a uful ol in interrogation. this guy this detainee was brought aboard three times and none of that produced any information of any real particular use. he did fill in some gaps but it wasn't like this critical pace of information that came from the conventional interrogation. >> rose: what do cia agents people that you know within the cia say about what they got from water boarding during those years and all of those dark places they had around the world. >> w
to reduce gun violence. >> before we let you go, we're talking about the fbi building sort of crumbling as it stands. >> yes. >> maryland and virginia, looking to bring that huge facility and the jobs and what have you into each state. you're interested in bringing the building to virginia? >> absolutely. the right answer is what's right for the fbi. i'm going to be passionate about virginia, and i expect folks from maryland will be passionate about maryland. but the right answer is what's right for the mission of the fbi. we think in virginia we've got good selling points on the table on that question, what's right for the fbi. huge kind of plurality of the fbi employees in virginia. we have significant fbi assets in virginia at quantico and manassas and having headquarters that's in close proximatity to the training centers and other fbi facilities makes a lot of sense from a cost standpoint. with the budget, we're dealing with rough budget issues. i think we'll be able to put options on the table in virginia that make a lot of sense from a cost standpoint. we're going to make our bes
and oil and rigged containers to explode. james holmes' apartment is at the top and according to an fbi bob technician, he said that holmes told him that he took a boom box and remote control car and placed it outside of a garage car. he said there was a cd that he made. the first 40 minutes was silent to timed out to start playing very loud music. holmes hoped that somebody would come over to that trash bag and then see the remote control car and start playing with it. except that remote control was was not triggered to move the car. it was triggered to set off a device inside the apartment and that would trigger a much larger explosion. according to the fbi bomb technician, james holmes planned to have his apartment explode to distract and overwhelm first responders and he would walk into the theater a few miles away and start shooting. it's the kind of elaborate diabolical plot that seems to work for villains in a batman movie but in real life this diabolical part of the plan didn't work. and, wolf, investigators also testified today that in the month leading up to the shooting james
but remained on the f.b.i.'s radar. he was extradited last week when his name surfaced into an investigation on a suicide bombing attack on the new york subway system that failed to be pulled off. he is the 8th defendant to face charges in brooklyn for the failed subway plot. you may remember one of his alleged coconspirators who pled guilty back in 2010. he and others were communicating with a shado shadowy al-qaida member. they were e-mailing phrases, such as marriage. he was stopped and the plot was foiled. nasir was using the name language as zazi while communicating with this guy in pack sthapb and was part of this kpheur to commit multiple terrorist attacks and that's why the u.s. attorney in the u.s. was able tow prosecute him. that first appearance scheduled about two hours from now. jenna we'll look forward to developments on that case. thank you. jon: a big take down for the f.b.i. to tell you about. federal agents scratching a name off their most wanted list, after this man is arrested on the other side of the world. details on the bust and his alleged crimes coming up. plus, heav
is on for a new location for the f.b.i. political leaders from virginia are making their pitch to replace the hoover building in downtown d.c. that the majority of employees live in that state. the group points out the academy and labs are located at quantico and agencies like the c.i.a. are nearby. >> we feel confident that as process and decision is made on the merits that virginia will be. >> both prince george's and in maryland say that will be successful as well. there is no timetable for a decision yet. >> as parts of the nation deal with a spike in flu season we're getting a better idea how bad the problem is in our area. >> what we've learned is that those who came to the c.v.s. hoping to get a flu shot, they got turned away. this c.v.s. promises flu shots every day but today they are out of the regular flu vaccine. >> it is a bad year. >> high demand for the flu vaccine is affecting local frarmcies. >> i'm going to get mine. >> i've been doing it for the last 10 years and so far it works for me. >> here in the district, 310 flu cases have been c
for a while, you can smell where there is more to the situation. i assume in those e-mail that the fbi got a hold of, additional information that would be embarrassing to petraeus, above and beyond extramarital affairs, which is why he resigned. someone in position who has been the ultimate insider for the cia has fallen victim to the surveillance state. that shows you how massively out of control this thing has become. it is like a vicious dog that has suddenly spotted its own tail and have gone after it. lashing out, it rationally, and now is effectively an insider and people are starting to take note. of course, that has been happening for most of us, although we cannot see the results for years. >> as we wrap up, your final thoughts, as you speak to us from political exile, from inside the ecuadorean embassy in london. this is extremely rare. how long do you plan to be holed up there. do you see yourself being there for years? >> possibly. the ecuadorean agreement says it takes 200 years for mr. assange to be safe. there is an ecuadorean national election in february next year. it seem
a strong push to can convince the fbi to move to northern virginia. a stakes holder meeting is taking place. prince george's is also fighting the bring the fbi to maryland. the relocation could bring with it about 12,000 jobs and a cut of the agency's $8 billion budget. this morning, several new incentives are on the table after virginia governor bob mcdonald delivered his state of the commonwealth address pushing a $3.1 billion transportation plan including more money for the dulles metro extension and funds projects that could relieve traffic jams in northern virginia and an education plan pushing teacher pay raises, new jobs and investment in charter schools and you were abling the general assembly to put politics aside and get to work. >> if politics trumps effective governing then we all lose. if we're remembered at all, then we'll all be remembered for what we actually get done. not what we promised to do. >> mcdonald also wants to eliminate the gas tax and make up the difference by slightly raising the sales tax. >>> the number of flu cases across the u.s. continues to multiply. so f
over each of the 166 counts against james holmes. we also heard from an fbi bomb tech, an atf supervisor, who testified about the extent to which holmes booby-trapped his apartment with homemade napalm, propane and gas triggers. in the two months leading up tote shooting holmes purchased 6295 rounds of ammunition as well as tear gas, ballistic gear and handcuffs. on cross-examinations holmes defense attorney asked one of the agents if there was anything in colorado law that prevented someone with mental illness from making any of these purchases and the agent said no, jenna. jenna: there comes up for one of the first times it is coming up in this preliminary hearing. we know the defense will be calling its own witness. tell us about who those people potentially could be and also how does that procedure, a defense calling witnesses in this preliminary hearing, how typical is that? >> that isn't something that usually happens but legal analysts are saying that what they think is happening here is that the defense is using this opportunity in the hearing to start the process of b
interested in what we were doing, and so the assistant director of the fbi for counter-terrorism came to west point and said the fbi could benefit from this kind of education as well. and so they asked west point to go and expand our education for cadets to what we now call practitioner education. we send people from west point and combating and they teach each new about a boc of instruction on terrorism to reinforce the things that are taught at the f.b.i. academy. we also send them out around the nation to be able to work with joint terrorism task forces, which is not just f.b.i. people, but also law enforcement and others to educate them on the terrorist threat and the changes. and then creating a virtual network because of the connections of everybody on the internet so that when pracktigsners that are out there in police departments or the f.b.i. are studying a particular case or aspect of terrorism they can reach back into the literature and research at west point and get a little bit more expertise and the history and the background and the theory that they're able to do. >> what kind
interested in what we were doing, and so the assistant director of the fbi for counter- terrorism came to west point and said the fbi could benefit from this kind of education as well. and so they asked west point to go and expand our education for cadets to what we now call practitioner education. we send people from west point and combating terrorism center down to quantico, virginia, to the fbi academy, and they teach each new agent and new analyst instruction on terrorism to reinforce the kinds of things that are taught at the fbi academy. to come here and be informed about what we are doing to counter terrorism and where that is going. i'll tell you a little bit about that. i do want to state for all of you and especially for c-span these are my personal academic opinions and not the position of the united states government so they have that disclaimer out there. although, as you'll hear as i'm talking about it, i think it should be the position of the united states government. >> we know of osama bin lot and hiding and others hiding in various areas and in other places until the
into the arrested may, the interrogators, one from the fbi and one from the cia, one from the military -- >> 3 interrogators. >> and a translator. they told me your story is curious. you do not have -- you are now in guantanamo and we wait until we get decisions from the pentagon to release you. until that time, we want you to be patient and to cooperate with our people. later on, someone came and they told me, you are here. cooperate. what that means, you said in kandahar you are ready to cooperate with us. i told him, yes, i said that, but i said great, to answer questions, not to work with the. he said, no, we understand you want to be with us, work with us. there would take care by family if i work with them and the cia to continue my job with the jazeera as a journalist just to give them some information about the link between al jazeera and al qaeda and the terrorist people of the land. of course are refused to do that. i told them i was a journalist and as a journalist and never [indiscernible] in may they released me. during this time, they're using torture with everybody. you just ha
defaulting on everything, and really i mean everything else. the fbi will shut down, people responsible for tracking down loose nuclear weapons, the court system closes its doors. the faa off line, parks closed, food safety inspections, they stop, nobody gets tax refunds or fixes your roads. it is bad, second, meanwhile, too, the financial markets will go into complete chaos, u.s. government debt is after all the safest investment in the world, so it is used as the benchmark for all other types of debt. what that means, when you buy a mortgage the government looks at what it pays to borrow and begins your estimate there. if we spike the treasury rate because nobody trusts our government anymore that spikes credit card rates and mortgage rates. not to mention all manner of trillions and trillions of dollars of weird financial derivatives that are also bench marked to treasuries. the damage to the economy on that would be unbelievable. and it would occur at every level from individuals looking for a loan to get a house to hedge funders trying to play the markets. so it would be like 2008
are making a strong push to bring the fbi headquarters to the commonwealth. mark warner and tim kaine and members of area board of supervisors gathered in arlington yesterday. they stopped short of endorsing a specific location but say a metro accessible warehouse owned by government in springfield is ideal. prince george's county is pushing to bring the site to maryland. >>> new evidence could jeopardize the conviction of the man who killed chandra levy. it could taint the -- he was convicted in 2010 of killing the 24-year-old in 2001. chandra levy's body was found a year later. that's about all we know at this point. there have reportedly been two secret meetings between the judge and prosecutors which is very rare according to some defense attorneys. >> the secrecy it's reported as a result of a judge not wanting there to be public disclosure and apparently to protect witnesses. i get that. but it's exceedingly rare. i've never seen it. >> this new evidence could lead to a new trial for guandique who was in jail when he was charged with levy's murder. it's not clear whether the evi
interviewed. there were clues in the fbi. the fbi did not talk to the cia. we came up with a model that fixed the pentagon. the pentagon used to have the services staffing and fighting separate wars. they would equip themselves separately. we decided to do what the military did. a joint command was created. he can come from any military service. they now trained and equipped to gather. -- togetherthe dni is the joint commander across 16 intel agencies. he leverage is their strength to produce intel products. that is the backbone of how we get intelligence to policy makers and that has dramatically improved. on the fusion centers, that is a different thing. those are local centers that have gone up to serve local law enforcement. they pull together national intelligence streams that they get from the homeland security department or the fbi with streams of local intelligence and a share it. the homelands department has tried to insist on privacy in these agencies and provide some financial support. this is a work in progress. some of them worked very well. one in los angeles works very well. ot
reasons. called curveball we never directly interviewed. we had clues in the fbi, that the fbi didn't do so for the, is better. those of us in congress on the intelligence committees looked at how to fix this, we came up with a model that in my view fix the pentagon. the pentagon new search services. the army, navy and the other services basically staffing inside doors, not technically true, but they would equip themselves differently. command structures were separated. so we decided to do with the military did under so-called goldwater-nichols, were each right command was created. he can come from many military service over the foreign military services and i now train and equip and fight wars together. so the dni, director of national intelligence is situate commander across 16 intel agencies and they now fight in equip together and he leverages their strengths to produce intel products and our national intelligence estimate, nies, but that both of how weak it intelligence to policymakers are enormously improved since we did this organizational change and i support it. on the fusion ce
fbi deputy director who guess what, has worked with the real ncis. john miller. this is what i got -- two bad [ bleep ] sitting at the table. that's what i think is so much fun about your show. she is a bad [ bleep ] but also manages to show vulnerability and emotion from time to time. >> yes. she does. >> good. >> i think the writers and the people like to see that. and i've always said that i -- i never thought vulnerability is a bad thing. i think vulnerability is a strength. >> uh-huh. >> i think if people were able to be more comfortable with their vulnerability, i think we'd be a more honest people. >> you have leon carroll there, a retired ncis agent, on set looking at the scripts. but when you have a question of what would an agent do here how would you take this or clear this room, is that useful? >> of course. you know we are actors. and as actors we are very curious people by nature. and we may have an idea of how to do things but the reality is that we are not trained, you know we have to ask, and we rely on hurt cure-- rely on our curiosity to do thin
also created the department of home and security, and the national security elements of the fbi were merged into its national security branch. these efforts were born of the need to institutionalize and facilitate information sharing and to bridge a gap that existed between our intelligence and law-enforcement capabilities. on the heels of all of this change, it also became evident that and other service was in high demand, it is what the wmd commission called "thoughtful and constructive legal guidance." following recommendations from that commission and others, the national security division was created within the department of justice to make sure we have a unity of purpose among the intelligence community and law enforcement and prosecutors. functions division's reflect the removal of legal and cultural barriers. nsd has brought them under one roof and is in closer alignment with those of the fbi and the rest of the national security community. nsd's lawyers worked as terrorism prosecutors alongside their colleagues in the u.s. attorney offices around the country and they work as
counterterrorism director, jeff porter, he has briefed the fbi on the situation, and chris lawrence. our pentagon correspondent. chris, let me start with you. the state department says we have to do the job right. the defense department says the united states will be involved in mali. what are you hearing tonight as far as u.s. intervention? >> they're narrowing down the option. piloted planes to gather some intelligence is one option. drones, although one official told me those are in very high demand with things going on in yemen and afghanistan, libya and other areas around the world. he said look for possibly some air lift capacity. in other words, big cargo planes that would allow the french to get more equipment to where it's needed in mali, and refueling capability. in other words, the french jets doing some of the bombing, these american refueling tankers could pull up alongside them, and the french jets could refuel in air so they could go longer and further without having to come back to a base. >> interesting options. they're so eager to say there won't be mass combat troops on the gro
the $14.4 billion that funds the f.b.i., the d.e.a., the secret service, the a.t.f. and the u.s. marshal service. this is a historic reversal, because in 1986 when this all began, i.n.s. comprised 28% of the spending of all of the other law enforcement agencies. and if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that very clearly shows this and what a historic change has taken place over this period of time. border enforcement by far is the largest share of this spending. it's the largest spending for everything in the immigration system, all of the other immigration functions, and among other things it's made possible the doubling of the border patrol in just the last eight years from $10,819 to where it stands today which is in the neighborhood of 21,370. but even though c.v.p. and its growth is enormous, the growth of i.c.e. is also very substantial. that growth has been 87% since 2005, from a number of $3.1 billion to today about $5.9 billion. so those are the big framing points that i hope paints a picture of what it is that we're doing in this report. let m
harzi, again had been arrested and held for several months. the fbi actually interrogated him back in late december. but as a witness to the attack on benghazi, not necessarily a prime suspect. when caveat to his release is he does have to remain near the capital of tunisia in case the court needs to get healed of 4i78. some of the cameras at the consulate did capture of the faces of some people, but very few have you questioned as suspects, primarily because the libyan government is to weak and some of the militia groups that may have been involved are very, very strong in that country. there's been a lot of criticism, you know, that president obama promised during the campaign to bring the killers of ambassador chris stevens to justice. obviously that hasn't happened yet. even though these are very different attacks, when you look back historically, the attack on the "uss cole" took about two years to get an arrest in that case. khalid sheikh mohammed was arrested about a year after the attacks on september 11th. so sometimes those arrests and investigations do take time, but one
that authorities say maicon taken human remains is a lot deeper than first thought. fbi agents are getting ready to dig up the well in the town of linden to look for more possible victims of the speed freak killers. yesterday agents determined the well is 200 feet deep. at first they thought it was 50 feet deep. special equipment reportedly will be brought into drain the well. that may take a few more days. >> happening now the cdc updating the flu season which is in full force. it's happening at a press conference in atlanta georgia and this as the cdc announced a shortage of the vaccine. that could be a problem since 20 children across the nation and two elderly people in california have died from the illness. between september and december more than 22,000 flu case was reported. the cdc said this season could be the worst in a decade. >> i have had asthma in the past and so i was high risk so i always got the flu shot. >> doctors say if you do get the flu shot it still takes two weeks for it to be effective. i have been meaning to get a shot but i don't have the time but i won't have time
-- we don't track gun sales in america. we just track the fbi background checks, kind of a proxy for what sales are. walmart also wanting it to be known that after they decided to meet with the vice president's task force, they didn't meet with the vice president. instead, eric holder, who you see on the screen there, and after their change of calendar to meet with the vice president, the vice president didn't actually meet with them. it was eric holder, and walmart wanting to get on the record that they were not pleased about that change. we gave them such a kind of hard time. >> hard time? >> about not coming to the meetings and they met with the attorney general. seventh in line, and the vice president first in line. i guess it's a pecking order. >> it's not like he's an intern. >> quite frankly, some say the reason the retailers were working with the attorney general, legal issues, background checks, restrictions on ammo, waiting periods, the like. that drama continues. a gun violence group planning next week a big protest at a walmart in connecticut. they would like walmart
for transfer, yet the cia and the department of justice and the fbi and the department of defense have left that and concluded that we're not going to prosecutor them, we don't have evidence they committed an offense and we don't believe they present a significant risk, and we don't want to keep them. but they have been sitting here year after year are after year at guantanamo because of their citizenship, primarily yemeni, because we don't trust the yemeni government to be responsibility with the detainees, which is interesting because the had the cop sent of theem meni government to fly the drones. so it seems we're a bit hypocritical in our view of the yemen. and i think guantanamo remains a stain on our reputation. recently congress passed a bill that prohibits granting visas to members of the russian government accused of human rights violations, and president obama signed it. in retaliation the russian government passed a bill that prevents americans from adopting russian children. and president president putin be signing it, had a news conference and was quite angry about the bill ou
it was available, a price tag that $18 billion. that is 24% greater than the $14.4 billion that funds the fbi, dea, secret service, and the u.s. marshal service. this is a historic reversal. in 1986 when this all began, we comprise less than 25% of all of the spending of all of the other law-enforcement agencies. if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that shows what a historic change has taken place over this period of time. it is by far the largest share of spending. among other things, it is me doubling of the border patrol in his just the last eight years from 10,819 words since today the 21,370. even though it's growth is enormous, the gross growth of i.c.e. is also substantial. it has been 21% since 2005. it is about 5.9 billion today. those are the big framing points that help paint the picture of what it is we are doing in this report. let me now go to the couple of pillars that i will go to to try and frame this for you. this has been built. therefore, what is in place allows for the targets based on information in rapid response. and it is not subjective
and criminal investigators, more than any other ig, more than any other fbi but it's not just her size in our mandate or unique authorities that is important. it's how we and how i view our mission and how are agency views our mission. when i joined sigar, i made it clear on the first day i got there that you should view this as a mission calm, not as a job. if you view this as a job, if you view it as a place to retire and play, you should leave because i only want people and it's a term i use, with fire in the valley because belly because we have a limited amount of time to do good in reconstruction in afghanistan. i abuse that fire in the belly speech so much that my chief of staff has coined a new term called 50 fire in the belly. aphis be memos and you know something, it worked. i am proud of my 200 agent auditors and investigators because they all have that ire in the belly. they could work elsewhere elsewhere. they are working in conditions as bad as our military is in afghanistan but many of them are housed in the same facility. there are men and women, but they take that mission beca
in the database. when you buy a gun, and they call into what we call the nik system that the fbi runs, that runs it through all the databases, and says whether you can or cannot buy that gun, now, if you've been adjudicated to be a violent schizophrenic, you may not be on that list, and we think that you should be. a lot of the other proposals in the strictly gun area that the administration is making are what i call feel-good proposals. >> okay. >> for example, the high-capacity magazinese magazi. why do people need those. >> the ar-15s -- >> do you have an ar-15? >> i do not, but my daughter does. >> what does she need it for? >> a lot of people who have served in the military, like to shoot for fun at the range, and in competition, the same gun they learned on or something similar to the same gun. she was in the army, she learned on a military weapon, this is the semi-automatic civilian version of that. it's the only gun she owns because she likes to go to the range and she likes to shoot it. >> you heard general mcchrystal say last night on cnn, he doesn't see why these military-type weapons
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)